Integrating Gender Responsive Budgeting into the Aid Effectiveness Agenda: Country Summaries

Published: January 2009

This document outlines the main findings of the country research conducted under the European Commission (EC)/UNIFEM programme ?Integrating Gender Responsive Budgeting into the Aid Effectiveness Agenda'. The three-year programme is funded by the European Commission (EC) and consists of research and programmatic technical assistance.

Key Findings

  • Nepal: GRB needs to be more systematically applied and ownership created in all ministries, departments, district/ village level offices and local self-government institutions.
  • Nepal: GRB needs to be more systematically applied and ownership created in all ministries, departments, district/ village level offices and local self-government institutions.
  • Nepal: The scoring system should be revised and made more appropriate to the institutional objectives, targets and inputs of ministries, and integrated into the regular quarterly expenditure monitoring and management system.
  • Nepal: The scoring system should be revised and made more appropriate to the institutional objectives, targets and inputs of ministries, and integrated into the regular quarterly expenditure monitoring and management system.
  • Nepal: GRBC should include representation from different societal groups and gender experts.
  • Nepal: GRBC should include representation from different societal groups and gender experts.
  • Peru: The capacities of MIMDES and MEF need to be strengthened to systematically link national policies, including those on gender equality, with programmes and the budget. The ministries also have to be trained on developing gender-sensitive results indicators.
  • Peru: The capacities of MIMDES and MEF need to be strengthened to systematically link national policies, including those on gender equality, with programmes and the budget. The ministries also have to be trained on developing gender-sensitive results indicators.
  • Peru: A gender-specific national budget classification code should be developed.
  • Peru: A gender-specific national budget classification code should be developed.
  • Peru: Evaluators from the MEF need to be provided with examples on how to incorporate gender into the project appraisal format of the SNIP. The proposal should provide evidence of the cost and benefits of integrating a gender perspective into public investments.
  • Peru: Evaluators from the MEF need to be provided with examples on how to incorporate gender into the project appraisal format of the SNIP. The proposal should provide evidence of the cost and benefits of integrating a gender perspective into public investments.
  • Peru: Permanent technical assistance needs to be provided to the National Gender Machinery, and the MIMDES to monitor the gender implications of programmes included in the result-oriented budget. Gender focal points also need capacity building.
  • Peru: Permanent technical assistance needs to be provided to the National Gender Machinery, and the MIMDES to monitor the gender implications of programmes included in the result-oriented budget. Gender focal points also need capacity building.
  • Peru: Advocacy needs to be undertaken to include a gender focal point in the National Centre for Strategic Planning.
  • Peru: Advocacy needs to be undertaken to include a gender focal point in the National Centre for Strategic Planning.
  • Ethiopia: The PASDEPs need to include gendersensitive indicators to enable an assessment of the gender implications of budgets of the Ministries of Agriculture-Rural Development and Health.
  • Ethiopia: The PASDEPs need to include gendersensitive indicators to enable an assessment of the gender implications of budgets of the Ministries of Agriculture-Rural Development and Health.
  • Ethiopia: The MOFED women's affairs department and the budgeting and planning department heads need to carry out a more substantive GRB analysis in the Ministry of Agriculture-Rural Development and Ministry of Health. The information can be used to develop gender budget statements and inform advocacy actions.
  • Ethiopia: The MOFED women's affairs department and the budgeting and planning department heads need to carry out a more substantive GRB analysis in the Ministry of Agriculture-Rural Development and Ministry of Health. The information can be used to develop gender budget statements and inform advocacy actions.
  • India: Systematic and comprehensive monitoring and auditing mechanism for GRB should be set up, including mandatory gender audits of all Centrally Sponsored Schemes.
  • India: Systematic and comprehensive monitoring and auditing mechanism for GRB should be set up, including mandatory gender audits of all Centrally Sponsored Schemes.
  • India: A permanent district women's agency should be created to monitor all schemes for women at the district and grassroots level, and a Women's Ward Sabha's set up to ensure that women participate in monitoring these schemes.
  • India: A permanent district women's agency should be created to monitor all schemes for women at the district and grassroots level, and a Women's Ward Sabha's set up to ensure that women participate in monitoring these schemes.
  • India: Gender concerns should be integrated into the local-level budgetary process by strengthening local women's participation. Local budgets should also include targeted programmes for women.
  • India: Gender concerns should be integrated into the local-level budgetary process by strengthening local women's participation. Local budgets should also include targeted programmes for women.
  • Morocco: Donors should harmonize their activities and support for gender equality. Key central ministries and gender experts should participate in the donor harmonization group.
  • Morocco: Donors should harmonize their activities and support for gender equality. Key central ministries and gender experts should participate in the donor harmonization group.
  • Morocco: A review of sectoral strategies should be undertaken using a GRB approach. Gender-responsive performance indicators should be identified, as long as budget support is subject to performance indicators.
  • Morocco: A review of sectoral strategies should be undertaken using a GRB approach. Gender-responsive performance indicators should be identified, as long as budget support is subject to performance indicators.
  • Morocco: Sector strategies need to reflect the priorities identified by regions/provinces/communes. This is already envisaged for education, literacy, and health. Sectors need to need to address problems with inter-sectoral solutions.
  • Morocco: Sector strategies need to reflect the priorities identified by regions/provinces/communes. This is already envisaged for education, literacy, and health. Sectors need to need to address problems with inter-sectoral solutions.
  • Morocco: The Institute of Public Finance needs to integrate Gender Responsive Budgeting (GRB) tools and approaches into the training courses of public officers.
  • Morocco: The Institute of Public Finance needs to integrate Gender Responsive Budgeting (GRB) tools and approaches into the training courses of public officers.
  • Cameroon: A
  • Cameroon: Development partners should make gender equality a cross-cutting theme in all sectors of development aid; to achieve this, training and tools are needed.
  • Cameroon: Parliamentarians should play a key role in integrating gender issues into national budgets.
  • Cameroon: Sensitization and training initiatives should target the government administration as well as civil society to encourage real lobbying and advocacy agenda around gender equity in financing.
  • Cameroon: A budget circular or a ministerial order should integrate gender instructions in order to reinforce the importance of integrating gender issues into budgets.
  • Ethiopia: MOFED should target ministries to create awareness and promote the use of the MOFED GRB guidelines, as well as providing capacity development for government officials.
  • Ethiopia: A gender equality response manual for agricultural and rural development and health sectors should be developed, as the two ministries receive a large volume of aid, are priority areas for pro-poor initiatives in the PASDEP, and address women's substantive priorities for equality.
  • Ethiopia: A gender equality response manual for agricultural and rural development and health sectors should be developed, as the two ministries receive a large volume of aid, are priority areas for pro-poor initiatives in the PASDEP, and address women's substantive priorities for equality.
  • Rwanda: The public sector reforms and the Public Finance Management reform should be used as an entry point for GRB.
  • Rwanda: Capacities need to be built within key institutions at national and local level through training and technical backstopping in areas of gender planning and budgeting.
  • Rwanda: The monitoring of progress by regularly reporting on and assessing results needs to be strengthened. The Government needs to develop a system of providing coherent, comparable, timely sex-disaggregated data to monitor implementation of the National Gender Policy; data should also be disaggregated by other background variables.
  • Rwanda: MINECOFIN in collaboration with MIGEPROF should develop accountability mechanisms between Government and development partners to ensure that budgeting and financing procedures are gender-responsive.
  • Tanzania: The budget guidelines should have more detailed instructions about how sectors can in practice make their budgets gender-responsive. Performancebased budgeting guides should also integrate GRB. The MKUKUTA and sector reviews should consistently report sex disaggregated data for all of the sex-disaggregated indicators in the MKUKUTA Monitoring Masterplan.
  • Tanzania: Gender actors should advocate for
  • sectoral gender issues to be raised by the active sectoral donors in sector groups.
  • Tanzania: GBS PAF indicators, which are renegotiated to some extent annually, should include gender-sensitive indicators.
  • Uganda: As Uganda's PEAP is coming to an end in 2008/2009, key GRB players should engage in the development of the new NDP, in order to ensure that gender is effectively mainstreamed and that GBS is more gender-responsive.
  • Uganda: The DCG should ensure that the JAF can be used to assess Government's performance against its gender commitments. Progress made on gender equality and women's empowerment should be one of the agreed prior actions that have to be fulfilled in order for funds to be released.
  • Uganda: GRB training should involve all members of the Sector Working Groups with special emphasis on sector planners, budget officers, and gender focal points. Training for MoFPED budget officers who are responsible for vetting the BFPs should emphasize gender auditing.
  • Uganda: In collaboration with the MoFPED budget officers, the national gender group should conduct gender audits of BFPs to assess the impact of the GRB initiative.
  • Uganda: CSOs should take advantage of the space provided by the MoFPED to play a more proactive role in the budgetary process.
  • Mozambique: The GRB programme should find ways to collaborate with working groups that are involved in discussions related to GBS, such as the Economist Working Group, the Budget Analysis Group, and the Poverty Analysis and the Monitoring Systems Group. The Annual and Mid-Annual Reviews are an ideal occasion to carry out a gender review of all sector policies. Tracking, monitoring, and evaluation exercises could provide opportunities for collaboration.
  • Mozambique: Gender priorities and activities should be included in indicator/targets matrices. Caution should be exercised with aggregate indicators. While these provide useful sources of data, centrally reported results can be over-aggregative and potentially misleading, concealing growing gaps between different socio-economicgroups and geographic locations.
  • Mozambique: The full potential of GRB instruments and approaches should be exploited, especially in discussions on public finance management, capacity building or technical assistance, budgetary allocations, and monitoring and evaluation processes.
  • Mozambique: Donors (such as the EC) that have already developed general gender guidelines should invest in adapting these to the specific country context.
  • Rwanda: An institutional framework should be put in place to ensure more efficient monitoring and coordination of GRB processes.

Publishers UN Women

Geographic Focus Africa (Western)-Cameroon, Asia (Southeastern)-India, Africa (Eastern)-Ethiopia, Africa (Northern)-Morocco, Africa (Southeastern)-Mozambique, Asia (Southern)-Nepal, South America (Northwestern)-Peru, Africa (Central)-Rwanda, Africa (Eastern)-Tanzania, Africa (Eastern)-Uganda